The Director’s Chair Issue #133 – Aug. 19, 2009 (High-Tech Movie Tools)

by Peter D Marshall

 

=======================================================
=======================================================

THE DIRECTOR’S CHAIR
Free Monthly Ezine for Independent Filmmakers
August 19, 2012                Scene 13 – Take 8
=======================================================
=======================================================
Published once a month.Publisher: Peter D. Marshall
Email: mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com
Website: http://actioncutprint.com
Blog: http://filmdirectingtips.com

=======================================================

Dear Filmmaker,

You are receiving “The Director’s Chair” because you (or
someone using your email address) requested a subscription.

PRIVACY STATEMENT: This Subscriber List is a private mailing
list and will not be made available to other companies or individuals.
I value every Subscriber and respect your privacy.
=======================================================
Contents
=======================================================

1. Introduction
2. Bonuses for Subscribing to The Director’s Chair
3. Advanced Blocking: 2 Day Filmmaking Workshop
4. FEATURE ARTICLE: High-Tech Movie Tools
5. Subscriber Shameless Self-Promotion
6. Filmmaking Links of Interest
7. Product Promotion and Film Workshops
8. Subscribe and Unsubscribe Information
9. Copyright Information

=======================================================
1. Introduction
=======================================================

Welcome to Issue #133 of The Director’s Chair August 19, 2012

1. Feature Article – The feature article this month is called:
Want to Make Movies? High-Tech Tools Are Accessible to All by
Kerstin Karlhuber & Daniel Jay Paul.

Because technology is moving so quickly, it’s easy to miss out
on gadgets that may impact one’s life.

“Anyone with a cell phone knows how accessible taking pictures
and shooting footage is nowadays, but with a minimum of
investment, movie fans can tell their own stories with the
same professional hardware that legends are using today,” says
seasoned filmmaker Kerstin Karlhuber. (Read full article below.)

2. Please send any comments, suggestions, questions or advice
to: mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com

=======================================================
2. Two Bonuses For Subscribing To The Director’s Chair
=======================================================

Thank you very much for subscribing to this ezine.

BONUS #1 – Here is the link to download Day One (30 pages) of
“The Art and Craft of the Director Audio Seminar.”
http://actioncutprint.com/xxx

BONUS #2 – Here is the link to download the first 27 pages of
the “Script Breakdown and Film Scheduling Online Course.”
http://actioncutprint.com/xxx

=======================================================
3. Advanced Blocking: 2 Day Filmmaking Workshop with
Peter D. Marshall (December 8 & 9, Toronto, Canada)

=======================================================

When you first start directing, blocking actors in a scene can
be one of the hardest (and most embarrassing) parts of your
job. If you get it wrong here, you could waste valuable
shooting time trying to get out of the mess you created!

But like anything else in life, blocking takes practice and
the more times you do it, the more comfortable you will become.

Blocking is simply working out the details of the actor’s
moves in relation to the position of the camera. Because
viewer emotion is the ultimate goal of each scene, how (and
why) the actors move, and where you place the camera, involves
knowing what emotion you want the audience to experience at
any given moment.

Audiences today are very sophisticated and they will assume
that every shot, movement or word of dialogue in a film is
there to further the central idea. Therefore, each shot you
use can either enhance or detract the audience’s understanding
of what the scene is really about and what the characters are feeling.

To help you enhance your blocking skills, I have partnered
with Raindance Canada again for another weekend workshop
called Advanced Blocking on December 8 & 9, 2012 in Toronto, Canada.
http://raindancecanada.com/event-registration/?regevent_action=register&event_id=159

This 2-day hands-on workshop concentrates on constructing
shots and blocking actors in a scene and is designed for
directors and actors who want to better understand the
complicated process of scene analysis and blocking actors on set.

In this workshop you will also have the opportunity to
participate in blocking a scene with professional actors and
the scene will be recorded to play back for discussion and review.

DAY ONE

1. Introduction
2. The Tools of a Director
3. The Tools of the Actor
4. The Actor/Director Relationship
5. Creative Script and Scene Analysis
6. Character Development and Analysis
7. The Psychology of Movement
8. Blocking and Staging Techniques
9. Practice: Blocking and Subtext Demo
10. Tips for Blocking and Staging a Scene
11. Tips for Working with Actors on Set.
12. Homework for Day Two

DAY TWO

1. Practice: Scene Presentations with Actors
2. Review Video of Scene Presentations
3. That’s a Wrap

Who Should Take this Course

Film Directors, Screenwriters, Actors, Producers who want to
more deeply understand the techniques directors use to create
great shots and block scenes on set and directors and
producers who wish to better understand how to communicate and
work with actors.

For more information on how to register for this 2 day Advanced Blocking
workshop, please contact Tiska or Jaimy at Raindance Canada.
http://raindancecanada.com/event-registration/?regevent_action=register&event_id=159

============================================================
4. Feature Article: High-Tech Movie Tools
============================================================

Want to Make Movies? High-Tech Tools Are Accessible to All.

Award-Winning Director Gives Tips for Ambitious Amateurs.

Because technology is moving so quickly, it’s easy to miss out
on gadgets that may impact one’s life.

“Anyone with a cell phone knows how accessible taking pictures
and shooting footage is nowadays, but with a minimum of
investment, movie fans can tell their own stories with the
same professional hardware that legends are using today,” says
seasoned filmmaker Kerstin Karlhuber.

She completed her latest project, “Tides of the Heart”
http://www.silentgiantproductions.com in collaboration with
partner and renowned songwriter Daniel Jay Paul.

“It’s a feature-length music video – there’s no dialogue. The
story is told completely through the music and Kerstin’s
direction,” says Paul, whose latest album, “Clean Getaway”
http://www.danieljaypaul.com, not only makes up much of the
score for the film, but also structures the plot.

“With the technology available today, you can really afford to
experiment and innovate. That’s what keeps pushing the
artistry to the next level,” he says.

Karlhuber and Paul offer suggestions for creative-minded
individuals who have been kicking around ideas, but haven’t
yet pulled the trigger on a project:

1. The Canon EOS 5D Mark III: Canon v. Nikon. Who cares? The
point is that the big dogs in the film business, from James
Cameron to Neill Blomkamp of indie-film success story,
“District 9,” are using digital gear that can be purchased by
the average movie fan. The sharpest, crispest picture in the
history of images can tell your story for a few thousand dollars.

2. Adobe, CyberLink, Final Cut Pro, etc.: Film editing
software, more than ever, is cheap, user-friendly and easy to
acquire. There are several tutorial demonstrations available
online, and if you need to come up with ideas for a project
brainstorm with friends or family. That’s half the fun.

3. Getting started: Sadly, most of the failure of creative
projects – whether film, music, art or writing – involves
work-ethic issues, or lack of confidence. Ask the following
questions: How long have I been thinking about my idea? Is my
vision doable? What’s keeping me from pursuing it? And,
perhaps the most insightful question, Why not?

4. A little help from your friends: Chances are that if you’re
a creative person, you have a few creative buddies who can
help you troubleshoot concepts and technical issues. Lean on
your artistic friends for moral support – they understand the
struggle of the creative process. The same people may be a
good source for constructive criticism, too, when the project
is nearing completion.

5. Consider trends: Karlhuber’s film has no dialogue and relies
solely on Paul’s songs for sound. The most recent Oscar winner
for best picture, “The Artist”also features no dialogue,
relying on old-school Hollywood visual drama. While this is a
coincidence, Karlhuber says it has helped her film gain
attention. “If your creative ideas happen to line up with a
trending topic, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t take
advantage of the public’s zeitgeist,” she says.

————————————————————
About Kerstin Karlhuber & Daniel Jay Paul

Kerstin Karlhuber is an award-winning filmmaker and director.
Her work in the arts has been seen around the world, from
off-Broadway to Cannes, the Arclight Theater in Los Angeles to
a segment on “Good Morning America.” She is the founder and
director of the film production company Silent Giant
Productions based in New York City.

Daniel Jay Paul is a songwriter who recently released “Clean
Getaway” on the Sunlight Communication Arts label. His songs
have been described by Music Express’ Marcus Wright as “music
you hear with your heart.” Paul is the author of the novel
“The Last Sunset.”
————————————————————

=======================================================
5. Subscriber Shameless Self-Promotion (Free Advertising)
=======================================================

The Director’s Chair gives you an incredible opportunity to
get Free Advertising for your services and your films.

Each month, I give two subscribers an opportunity to promote
themselves, their company or their productions in this
section.

So if you want over 5900 filmmakers around the world to know
about you and your films, please send me your “shameless
self-promotion” to: mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com.

Please limit your promotion to 300 words. I reserve the right
to edit the promotion for length, spelling and formatting.

—————

(1) No one submitted a self-promotion this month. 🙁

=======================================================
6. Filmmaking Links of Interest
=======================================================

1. Julie Delpy, Ava DuVernay and Leslye Headland on being
female filmmakers. http://bit.ly/Pu09GU

2. Independent Filmmaking: Passion or Profession?
http://su.pr/1nbgEH

3. Five alternative filmmaking collectives
http://su.pr/2y9eZV

4. Lars Von Trier Challenges the People – an open invitation
to filmmakers around the globe http://su.pr/2I0cuq

5. Filmmaking on a budget: 5 camcorders under $2,000
http://su.pr/8rCKNE

6. Apps help filmmakers rein in costs Smartphones offer
opportunity for amateurs, pros http://su.pr/1u3Qoc

7. Should You Be Thinking about Markets in Documentary
Filmmaking? http://su.pr/7t3tVX

8. How to Select Lenses for DSLR Filmmaking
http://su.pr/2CAlAN

9. A New Dimension of Filmmaking – How tragedy on the set
changed the way movies are made http://su.pr/1WEEtv

10. Future of Film: As Hollywood Shifts, Are Paradigms
Colliding? http://su.pr/1kAdyC

=======================================================
7. Product Promotion And Film Workshops
=======================================================

From time to time, I will contact you to inform you of film
workshops, filmmaking products or Online courses that I feel
are beneficial to filmmakers like yourself. Of course, you are
under no obligation to purchase anything – I only offer this
information as a service to subscribers of this free ezine.

=======================================================
8. Subscribe and Unsubscribe Information
=======================================================

1. To Subscribe to this Ezine, send an email to
mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com with SUB as the Subject

2. To Unsubscribe to this Ezine, reply to this email with
UNSUB in the Subject line

3. To Change Your Email Address, send an email with your old
and new email address to mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com

4. To Read Back Issues of The Director’s Chair, visit:
http://actioncutprint.com/subscription

5. Share This Ezine: Remember to share this ezine by email.
Forward it to your friends and associates.

6. Reprint This Ezine: This Ezine may be reprinted with
permission. Email me at: mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com

=======================================================
9. Copyright Information
=======================================================

Copyright (c) 2000-2012
ActionCutPrint.com
Peter D. Marshall
All Rights Reserved

=======================================================
=======================================================

 

 

 

=======================================================
=======================================================

THE DIRECTOR’S CHAIR
Free Monthly Ezine for Independent Filmmakers
August 19, 2012                Scene 13 – Take 8
=======================================================
=======================================================
Published once a month.Publisher: Peter D. Marshall
Email: mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com
Website: http://actioncutprint.com
Blog: http://filmdirectingtips.com

=======================================================

Dear Filmmaker,

You are receiving “The Director’s Chair” because you (or
someone using your email address) requested a subscription.

PRIVACY STATEMENT: This Subscriber List is a private mailing
list and will not be made available to other companies or individuals.
I value every Subscriber and respect your privacy.
=======================================================
Contents
=======================================================

1. Introduction
2. Bonuses for Subscribing to The Director’s Chair
3. Advanced Blocking: 2 Day Filmmaking Workshop
4. FEATURE ARTICLE: High-Tech Movie Tools
5. Subscriber Shameless Self-Promotion
6. Filmmaking Links of Interest
7. Product Promotion and Film Workshops
8. Subscribe and Unsubscribe Information
9. Copyright Information

=======================================================
1. Introduction
=======================================================

Welcome to Issue #133 of The Director’s Chair August 19, 2012

1. Feature Article – The feature article this month is called:
Want to Make Movies? High-Tech Tools Are Accessible to All by
Kerstin Karlhuber & Daniel Jay Paul.

Because technology is moving so quickly, it’s easy to miss out
on gadgets that may impact one’s life.

“Anyone with a cell phone knows how accessible taking pictures
and shooting footage is nowadays, but with a minimum of
investment, movie fans can tell their own stories with the
same professional hardware that legends are using today,” says
seasoned filmmaker Kerstin Karlhuber. (Read full article below.)

2. Please send any comments, suggestions, questions or advice
to: mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com

=======================================================
2. Two Bonuses For Subscribing To The Director’s Chair
=======================================================

Thank you very much for subscribing to this ezine.

BONUS #1 – Here is the link to download Day One (30 pages) of
“The Art and Craft of the Director Audio Seminar.”
http://actioncutprint.com/xxx

BONUS #2 – Here is the link to download the first 27 pages of
the “Script Breakdown and Film Scheduling Online Course.”
http://actioncutprint.com/xxx

=======================================================
3. Advanced Blocking: 2 Day Filmmaking Workshop with
Peter D. Marshall (December 8 & 9, Toronto, Canada)

=======================================================

When you first start directing, blocking actors in a scene can
be one of the hardest (and most embarrassing) parts of your
job. If you get it wrong here, you could waste valuable
shooting time trying to get out of the mess you created!

But like anything else in life, blocking takes practice and
the more times you do it, the more comfortable you will become.

Blocking is simply working out the details of the actor’s
moves in relation to the position of the camera. Because
viewer emotion is the ultimate goal of each scene, how (and
why) the actors move, and where you place the camera, involves
knowing what emotion you want the audience to experience at
any given moment.

Audiences today are very sophisticated and they will assume
that every shot, movement or word of dialogue in a film is
there to further the central idea. Therefore, each shot you
use can either enhance or detract the audience’s understanding
of what the scene is really about and what the characters are feeling.

To help you enhance your blocking skills, I have partnered
with Raindance Canada again for another weekend workshop
called Advanced Blocking on December 8 & 9, 2012 in Toronto, Canada.
http://raindancecanada.com/event-registration/?regevent_action=register&event_id=159

This 2-day hands-on workshop concentrates on constructing
shots and blocking actors in a scene and is designed for
directors and actors who want to better understand the
complicated process of scene analysis and blocking actors on set.

In this workshop you will also have the opportunity to
participate in blocking a scene with professional actors and
the scene will be recorded to play back for discussion and review.

DAY ONE

1. Introduction
2. The Tools of a Director
3. The Tools of the Actor
4. The Actor/Director Relationship
5. Creative Script and Scene Analysis
6. Character Development and Analysis
7. The Psychology of Movement
8. Blocking and Staging Techniques
9. Practice: Blocking and Subtext Demo
10. Tips for Blocking and Staging a Scene
11. Tips for Working with Actors on Set.
12. Homework for Day Two

DAY TWO

1. Practice: Scene Presentations with Actors
2. Review Video of Scene Presentations
3. That’s a Wrap

Who Should Take this Course

Film Directors, Screenwriters, Actors, Producers who want to
more deeply understand the techniques directors use to create
great shots and block scenes on set and directors and
producers who wish to better understand how to communicate and
work with actors.

For more information on how to register for this 2 day Advanced Blocking
workshop, please contact Tiska or Jaimy at Raindance Canada.
http://raindancecanada.com/event-registration/?regevent_action=register&event_id=159

============================================================
4. Feature Article: High-Tech Movie Tools
============================================================

Want to Make Movies? High-Tech Tools Are Accessible to All.

Award-Winning Director Gives Tips for Ambitious Amateurs.

Because technology is moving so quickly, it’s easy to miss out
on gadgets that may impact one’s life.

“Anyone with a cell phone knows how accessible taking pictures
and shooting footage is nowadays, but with a minimum of
investment, movie fans can tell their own stories with the
same professional hardware that legends are using today,” says
seasoned filmmaker Kerstin Karlhuber.

She completed her latest project, “Tides of the Heart”
http://www.silentgiantproductions.com in collaboration with
partner and renowned songwriter Daniel Jay Paul.

“It’s a feature-length music video – there’s no dialogue. The
story is told completely through the music and Kerstin’s
direction,” says Paul, whose latest album, “Clean Getaway”
http://www.danieljaypaul.com, not only makes up much of the
score for the film, but also structures the plot.

“With the technology available today, you can really afford to
experiment and innovate. That’s what keeps pushing the
artistry to the next level,” he says.

Karlhuber and Paul offer suggestions for creative-minded
individuals who have been kicking around ideas, but haven’t
yet pulled the trigger on a project:

1. The Canon EOS 5D Mark III: Canon v. Nikon. Who cares? The
point is that the big dogs in the film business, from James
Cameron to Neill Blomkamp of indie-film success story,
“District 9,” are using digital gear that can be purchased by
the average movie fan. The sharpest, crispest picture in the
history of images can tell your story for a few thousand dollars.

2. Adobe, CyberLink, Final Cut Pro, etc.: Film editing
software, more than ever, is cheap, user-friendly and easy to
acquire. There are several tutorial demonstrations available
online, and if you need to come up with ideas for a project
brainstorm with friends or family. That’s half the fun.

3. Getting started: Sadly, most of the failure of creative
projects – whether film, music, art or writing – involves
work-ethic issues, or lack of confidence. Ask the following
questions: How long have I been thinking about my idea? Is my
vision doable? What’s keeping me from pursuing it? And,
perhaps the most insightful question, Why not?

4. A little help from your friends: Chances are that if you’re
a creative person, you have a few creative buddies who can
help you troubleshoot concepts and technical issues. Lean on
your artistic friends for moral support – they understand the
struggle of the creative process. The same people may be a
good source for constructive criticism, too, when the project
is nearing completion.

5. Consider trends: Karlhuber’s film has no dialogue and relies
solely on Paul’s songs for sound. The most recent Oscar winner
for best picture, “The Artist”also features no dialogue,
relying on old-school Hollywood visual drama. While this is a
coincidence, Karlhuber says it has helped her film gain
attention. “If your creative ideas happen to line up with a
trending topic, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t take
advantage of the public’s zeitgeist,” she says.

————————————————————
About Kerstin Karlhuber & Daniel Jay Paul

Kerstin Karlhuber is an award-winning filmmaker and director.
Her work in the arts has been seen around the world, from
off-Broadway to Cannes, the Arclight Theater in Los Angeles to
a segment on “Good Morning America.” She is the founder and
director of the film production company Silent Giant
Productions based in New York City.

Daniel Jay Paul is a songwriter who recently released “Clean
Getaway” on the Sunlight Communication Arts label. His songs
have been described by Music Express’ Marcus Wright as “music
you hear with your heart.” Paul is the author of the novel
“The Last Sunset.”
————————————————————

=======================================================
5. Subscriber Shameless Self-Promotion (Free Advertising)
=======================================================

The Director’s Chair gives you an incredible opportunity to
get Free Advertising for your services and your films.

Each month, I give two subscribers an opportunity to promote
themselves, their company or their productions in this
section.

So if you want over 5900 filmmakers around the world to know
about you and your films, please send me your “shameless
self-promotion” to: mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com.

Please limit your promotion to 300 words. I reserve the right
to edit the promotion for length, spelling and formatting.

—————

(1) No one submitted a self-promotion this month. 🙁

=======================================================
6. Filmmaking Links of Interest
=======================================================

1. Julie Delpy, Ava DuVernay and Leslye Headland on being
female filmmakers. http://bit.ly/Pu09GU

2. Independent Filmmaking: Passion or Profession?
http://su.pr/1nbgEH

3. Five alternative filmmaking collectives
http://su.pr/2y9eZV

4. Lars Von Trier Challenges the People – an open invitation
to filmmakers around the globe http://su.pr/2I0cuq

5. Filmmaking on a budget: 5 camcorders under $2,000
http://su.pr/8rCKNE

6. Apps help filmmakers rein in costs Smartphones offer
opportunity for amateurs, pros http://su.pr/1u3Qoc

7. Should You Be Thinking about Markets in Documentary
Filmmaking? http://su.pr/7t3tVX

8. How to Select Lenses for DSLR Filmmaking
http://su.pr/2CAlAN

9. A New Dimension of Filmmaking – How tragedy on the set
changed the way movies are made http://su.pr/1WEEtv

10. Future of Film: As Hollywood Shifts, Are Paradigms
Colliding? http://su.pr/1kAdyC

=======================================================
7. Product Promotion And Film Workshops
=======================================================

From time to time, I will contact you to inform you of film
workshops, filmmaking products or Online courses that I feel
are beneficial to filmmakers like yourself. Of course, you are
under no obligation to purchase anything – I only offer this
information as a service to subscribers of this free ezine.

=======================================================
8. Subscribe and Unsubscribe Information
=======================================================

1. To Subscribe to this Ezine, send an email to
mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com with SUB as the Subject

2. To Unsubscribe to this Ezine, reply to this email with
UNSUB in the Subject line

3. To Change Your Email Address, send an email with your old
and new email address to mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com

4. To Read Back Issues of The Director’s Chair, visit:
http://actioncutprint.com/subscription

5. Share This Ezine: Remember to share this ezine by email.
Forward it to your friends and associates.

6. Reprint This Ezine: This Ezine may be reprinted with
permission. Email me at: mailto:pdm@actioncutprint.com

=======================================================
9. Copyright Information
=======================================================

Copyright (c) 2000-2012
ActionCutPrint.com
Peter D. Marshall
All Rights Reserved

=======================================================
=======================================================

 

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